Summit Recap – Innovative Appoaches to Housing for All

By way of follow-up to February 15th's Foster Summit event, we're running summaries of topics and ideas from the Summit breakout sessions. We will publish these, along with the 'butcher paper' notes in the weeks to come.

Were you were there? What did we miss? Even if you couldn't attend the event, we hope you'll share your take on these important community issues.

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fostersummit_332We had a diverse and great group for the Foster Summit breakout session on housing.

Portland's hot real estate market of a few years ago gave way to a real estate crash in 2009, which is now being followed by a comeback of sorts. If these tribulations have buffeted the middle class, they've been devastating to low income Portlanders --many of whom are not Portlanders anymore.

Much of the housing discussion at the Foster Summit focused on ideas for how we, at the neighborhood level, could try to stem the negative impacts of these changes.

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Summit Recap – Arts, Culture and Community

By way of follow-up to February 15th's Foster Summit event, we've asked a couple of the attendees to share a summary of topics and ideas from the breakout session they attended. We will publish these, along with the 'butcher paper' notes in the weeks to come. (Sorry, no butcher paper notes for this one.)

Meg McHutchison participated in the discussion on ways to use the arts to create community in the Foster Road area, and she graciously agreed to share her notes on that discussion. Meg is a familiar face in the area, as a board member of both the Foster-Powell neighborhood and Performance Works Northwest, and as one of the prime movers in making the Foster Summit happen. Meg is the Creative Producer at the innovative Northwest design and marketing firm Gigantic Planet.

Were you were there? What did Meg miss? Even if you couldn't attend the event, we hope you'll share your take on these important community issues.

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It was a lively discussion among the participants of the Arts and Culture breakout session.

There are a number of new projects happening along the Foster Corridor and a number of themes that need further exploration and investment from the community.

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County Moves Forward on Wikman Building; Redevelopment Remains an Option

ArletaExterior1963

A 1950s photo of the Arleta Library at SE Holgate and 64th Avenue.

The former Arleta Library, known as the Wikman Building, moved one step closer to disposition today as the county re-opened the property for potential sale to a private developer.

By a 5-0 vote, the Multnomah County Commission moved to reissue a Request for Proposals (RFP) for the property. Although the terms of the RFP have not yet been determined, demolition and/or redevelopment remain in play.

The 1918 building was an original Carnegie library and was built on property purchased with contributions from local residents. (more…)

PDC Awards for Foster Organizations

LentsURAThe PDC has a big stake in Foster, with the western stretch of Foster road and Lents Town Center being a part of the Lents Urban Renewal Area. One of the perks of URA status is the opportunity to use local money for local improvements (It’s kind of like Vegas for taxes: What happens in Foster, stays in Foster). Most of the time the PDC spends our money for us on things we identified as important through past plans, such as the Foster Streetscape Plan, Reconstruction of Ramona St, and the Lents Gateway Monuments. Sometimes they use the money to buy up land and tear down buildings in the hope that something better will get built.  But every once and a while they come back to the community and make an offer for worthy local applicants. They call this the Community Livability Grant (more…)

Bellrose Station Volunteer Build Day – This Saturday!

We’ve talked about this before, and the day has arrived: ROSE Community Development is bringing the southeast community together to build a new playground in the Lents neighborhood!

The reasons are many –we all know that kids in East Portland don’t have access to the parks and playgrounds they need. Too many of them play in parking lots, or just don’t go outside at all.

But this Saturday will be a chance for neighbors to pitch in to help by building a playground from the ground up, all in one day! (more…)

ROSE Invites the Community to Help Build a Village

barn_raisingWhen Oregon was still the frontier, people often came together to build the things their towns needed. Today, we don’t build so many barns anymore, but there’s still a need for citizens to bring their energy and skills together to meet community needs.

ROSE Community Development purchased and rehabilitated Bellrose Station in 2010, providing clean and modern housing for 40 area families. The facility, located at 7901 SE 92nd Ave, has a brand new community room and a garden.

Next up on the agenda is a place for Bellrose’s 70 kids to play. Bellrose Station residents have planned a modest playground and are launching a campaign to raise the funds to build it. (more…)

Foster Green is Here to Stay

Yesterday, Portland City Council issued a resolution “recognizing” five EcoDistricts in the City, including our own Foster Green.

The emerging group has spent years establishing a functional process to coordinate the efforts of the EcoDistrict partners working in the community (partners like Zenger Farms, Audobon Society, ROSE CDC, and more).

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Meet your Neighbor: Nick Sauvie

Nick Sauvie
ROSE Community Development
5215 SE Duke, Portland, OR 97206

www.rosecdc.org

Who are you?
I’m a lifelong Portlander, went to Benson High School and University of Oregon. I like to hike and visit all over our beautiful state. My wife, Janet Bauer, is a Policy Analyst for the Oregon Center for Public Policy.

What do you do?
I’ve been Executive Director of ROSE Community Development since 1992.

What is your inspiration? (Why do you do what you do?)
I love Portland and Oregon. There are many, many examples of people getting together to make Portland a better city, for example by building light rail instead of the Mt. Hood Freeway.

What brought you and/or your business to this community?
I was hired as a community organizer by Southeast Uplift to work with 6 outer southeast neighborhoods including Foster-Powell. Previously, I’d been a Vista Volunteer there and helped organize the Belmont and Division street business associations.

3 Ways to unite the Fine Folks of our community?
Find a group of people you like, agree on a vision and get to work on something that gets us closer to the vision.

How do you envision the future of Foster?
One of Portland’s great commercial districts, with all kinds of interesting buildings, businesses and public spaces. Foster Road is no longer spoiled by 50 MPH auto traffic.

 Some top fives to appease the list lovers Your Top 5 Songs to get you through a life?
You Say It by Al Green, Rain by the Beatles, Think by Aretha Franklin, Junk Bond Trader by Elliott Smith, Stir it Up by Bob Marley and the Wailers

Your Top 5 Haunts in Portland
Crystal Springs Rhododendron Gardens, Music Millenium, Otto’s Sausage Kitchen, Springwater Trail, Powells Books

 

 

Rose CDC: 20 Years of Building Community

Many Foster folks don’t know the name of “Rose CDC,” but they know the work Rose has done in our area.

Rose Community Development Corporation built the new playground at Marysville School. They’ve hosted workshops for first-time homebuyers and for homeowners facing foreclosure. They’ve been key players in the Lents Urban Renewal Area, the East Portland Action Plan and the Wickman Community Center projects, to name just a few.

And they’ve converted dozens of run-down apartments into beautiful, stable homes that elevate our neighborhoods instead of diminishing them. (more…)

Meet your Neighbor: Nick Sauvie

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Nick Sauvie ROSE Community Development www.rosecdc.org Who are you? I’m a lifelong Portlander, went to Benson High School and University of Oregon. I like to hike and visit all over our beautiful state. My wife, Janet Bauer, is a Policy Analyst for the Oregon Center for Public Policy. What do … Continue reading